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The transition to remote work in March of 2020 arrived as an uncomfortable shock to many professionals in the tech industry.

Perhaps an even bigger shock? How much remote work has flourished since those early days of uncertainty.

According to Built In’s research, 68 percent of active job seekers in tech report that remote work is one of their largest incentives. Built In also found that 85 percent of companies noticed an increase in employee productivity after switching to remote work, and more than half of surveyed workers felt more efficient working out of a home office.

So why did it take organizations so long to take the plunge into a remote or hybrid work structure? For some, it might have been a preconception that employees could not work efficiently without being in the office. The more accurate answer, however, was that it required a massive overhaul of the current systems in place — team collaboration, company culture, virtual meeting software, onboarding and more. Since the system wasn’t visibly broken, what could remote work have to offer?

For Maggie Muller, senior talent acquisition specialist at Muck Rack, a whole lot, actually. “Last year we became a fully distributed team, pledging to never force anyone back into an office,” she said. “Thanks to this mentality, we’ve been able to grow our team all around the world with employees in 27 states and six countries outside of the U.S.”

Leaders at creative multimedia hub Pinata feel similarly. According to CEO Kyle Tautenhan, Pinata has grown by 525 percent in the past year after implementing remote hiring, but the collective company culture has only gotten stronger as they’ve scaled.

“We have a slide deck to share things about ourselves as a way for us to get to know each other a little better — photos of pets, hobbies, interests, the city they live in, where they went to school and even favorite ice cream flavors,” he said.

As tech companies continue to strive for innovation and propel into the uncertain future, it’s clear that remote work is here to stay. That’s why Built in Austin caught up with six industry leaders to learn how their organizations have recently embraced remote hiring, how they’re standing out to job seekers in a saturated market and all the ways new hires are feeling supported in a virtually powered world.

 

Dymphna Cordova

Chief People Officer

 

Squire is a software technology platform for barbershops.

 

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Source: https://www.builtinaustin.com/2022/04/27/6-austin-companies-investing-remote-hiring

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